August 2016 Newsletter

If you have to put this month’s issue of Pathways down for a minute to go outside and run around in a splash pad or grab a quick snow cone, don’t worry. We understand.

There’s only so much time left before school starts back up and so much Summer to be had!


Historic Transformation, Garfield Historic District

Garfield Historic District is our home, and the children who grow up here, its future leaders. But Garfield’s youth experience poverty and violence at higher levels here than nearly any other child in America.

New Pathways is working to reach further into our neighborhood to bring transformative mentoring to greater numbers of Garfield’s at-risk youth, breaking cycles of poverty and violence that distance a generation of young lives from reaching their full potential.

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With the help of our amAZing volunteers, staff and mentors, New Pathways for Youth is bringing historic transformations to our community and doing our part to close the opportunity gap for these inspiring youth.

Just three weeks ago, 30 youth from the area were matched with mentors from in and around the Garfield district. The expansion of our Transformative Mentoring Program is one of the many things we’re doing to bring hope to youth in one of the poorest and most dangerous neighborhoods in the country.


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In addition, this month we began expanding the New Pathways for Youth Parenting Program to include Garfield area parents and guardians. Both programs are designed to help parents and their youth build skills and the confidence necessary to further each child’s development.

How can you get involved in our historic effort? Simple! Get in touch with us and we’ll find a fit that works for you. Volunteer, Mentor, Donate—everyone’s invited to help us make a difference in our community!


Contact Marlo Apple to learn more!
Vote New Pathways for Youth

New Pathways for Youth has been selected as a finalist for one of the Phoenix Business Journal’s three “Phoenix Stories” grants. THANK YOU to everyone who has voted for us so far! But there’s still plenty of work to be done.

Thanks to a strong push last week, we jumped from 11th place to 7th in the standings. But if we can get the word out and get everyone who LOVES New Pathways to put in their vote, there’s no telling how high we could climb!

Vote Phoenix Stories
Click Here to Read our Story

VOTING ONLY TAKES A FEW SECONDS TO COMPLETE!

Vote for transformation, vote for your neighborhood, for his and her future.

WHATEVER YOU’RE VOTING FOR, GET OUT THERE AND VOTE!

[And by “get out there” we mean open another browser window 🙂 ]

Arizona Public Service Partner Profile

Intel is a champion for our youth! For more than a decade, Intel and their employees have been transforming lives at New Pathways for Youth. Recently, we got a chance to catch up with Renee Levin, Community Affairs and Education Manager at Intel, to find out what drives their commitment to our community.

So, why New Pathways for Youth?

New Pathways for Youth has always been an amazing mentoring organization. I knew Christy McClendon and I have known one another since before she arrived at New Pathways. When she became CEO, I knew that Christy would take New Pathways to a new level of excellence.

Why is it important that Intel gives back to the community?

One of Intel’s values is to be an asset to our communities, worldwide. Our local employees take this value to heart and engage in a broad range of community activities. These include volunteering at food banks, helping in the classroom, serving on nonprofit boards, caring for animals, and mentoring, to name a few. Intel® employees are encouraged to pursue their passions.

Where did Intel’s culture of giving come from?

It comes from our founders: Gordon Moore and Robert Noyce. Gordon, at the ripe age of 87, is still active in supporting STEM education. Through Intel Involved, our corporate volunteer program, we identify service opportunities for individual volunteers and organize team projects. OUr employees donate their time and talent to tackle environmental challenges, improve education and address other community needs.

In 2015, Intel employees reported 156,000 hours for volunteering at local arizona organizations. In May 2016, the intel foundation matched those hours and checks totalling $1.26 million were issued to 483 organizations

What is some advice Intel can give to other businesses/organizations still sitting on the sidelines?

Encouraging your employees to volunteer with organizations like New Pathways for Youth helps employees feel connected to their community and to their company. Intel employees who have become mentors tell me they learn new skills through these interactions, which, in turn, makes them better employees.

What’s one thing people probably don’t know about Intel?

We recently launched our new employee matching grant program, which supports employees who make charitable gifts. The gifts are matched dollar-for-dollar up to $5,000 for nonprofits and another $5,000 for schools, per employee!

Is your business ready to partner with New Pathways for Youth and make a big impact on our community?

Click here to make an impact!
New Pathways for Youth workshop; at-risk youth

Help us fill our volunteer gap at any one of these upcoming activities and projects!


After School Program

Assist ASP youth with various hands-on crafts, lessons and activities as needed. Individuals and groups welcome!

Number of Volunteers:

varies

Time Commitment:
2 hours


Gratitude Ambassador

Once a month, make calls, write cards and help personalize our appreciation for donors and volunteers who support our programs.

Number of Volunteers:

2–4

Time Commitment:
2–4 hours


NPFY Community Center
Assistance

Help NPFY staff clean and organize project spaces; inventory, organize and replace games, books and recreational equipment in youth rooms.

Number of Volunteers:

5–10

Time Commitment:
2–4 hours per week


Have a few hours to spare?Contact Volunteer Coordinator Katie Thorson